Research and Empower with RNR (or How to get Your New Tires All By Yourself)

Dear Bree,

My husband is cheap; let’s just start there.  I need new tires–3 for sure, but let’s round it up and go with four because, really, what’s the point in buying 3 new tires and leaving 1 half worn-out tire in place?  I have two bald front tires (I’m not even being dramatic here), and a rear tire with 2 screws in it (again, I’m not exaggerating).  The tire with the screws in it can’t be repaired because one screw is too close to the sidewall (by the way–is that true? What’s the deal with sidewalls?).  At any rate, I need a new set of tires, but instead of going out and getting them, my husband is putting it off–apparently until one blows out on the highway and I die.  I’m adding air to the rear tire every day now.  Do you know how inconvenient that is?  At this point, I’m thinking of taking care of this myself!  Got any help on ways to motivate a lazy, cheap husband?

Sincerely,

Fed Up in Indianapolis

 

Dear Fed Up,

I sympathize, but do you really need my help to torture your husband into bending to your will?;)  I’m guessing no, but here’s what I’ve got for you anyway.

1. Take his car.  Seriously, grab his keys and skedaddle before he does in the morning.  Let him drive your car around for a while looking for gas stations with air pumps and making sure he has quarters handy.  If you have an air compressor at home, hide your air pressure gauge and let him spend some time trying to fill that tire when he’s already running late for work.

2.  Throw the quarters out and call him every time you have to refill to come help you.:)

3.  Take out an extra life insurance policy on yourself; you know, just in case your tires blow out on the highway and you die.  Then, hand him the bill.

4.  This one is almost too easy, but brush up on the art of constant complaining and use it.

5.  Tell him you made an appointment to have new tires put on, and, no, you didn’t price shop or call more than one place.  You didn’t consult Consumer Reports either.

In all seriousness, needing new tires is no joke.  The sidewall “thing” you mentioned is true.  If an object punctures the tire too close to the sidewall, it shouldn’t be repaired because the integrity of the tire has been compromised and the chances for a blow out increase.  No reputable tire shop will repair a sidewall puncture, and tire manufacturers forbid it.

Want to know what I really think you should do?  Take matters into your own hands.  Research.  Look up the tires you have on your car now and consult some online sources for information about them.  Find out what other people think about your old tires compared to other brands of the same size tires.  Come in and talk to us.  We’ll help you figure out which set of tires is right for you and your budget.  We understand that very often women don’t want anything to do with automotive repairs and maintenance because they are afraid that they will be taken advantage of because of their lack of (or assumed lack of) knowledge about the subject, so educate yourself.  Do some research, come in and ask questions, pick our brains.  Tires are our business and we have a lot of knowledge to share.  And if the affordability of tires is an issue for you right now, we can help with that, too.  We can set you up with a payment plan that fits your budget and get you rolling again quickly.

Yes, it will take a little time and effort on your part, but in the end you’ll have the tires you need, some peace of mind, and maybe even a little feeling of victory that you didn’t need to wait for someone else to do this for you–and you can hold this over your husband’s head for all time.:)  Buck up, little cowgirl.  You’ve totally got this.

Bree